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File 161369851421.png - (31.97KB , 800x600 , 1 Title.png )
988462 No. 988462 ID: f18774

This is a story about the living weapons, tossed into an uncaring world, and left to seek their own answers. Will they survive?
55 posts omitted. Last 100 shown. Expand all images
>>
No. 988616 ID: 7fc9eb

For a name, how about Donner or Blitz? (referencing the A-10 Thunderbolt II)

Personally, I like Blitz.
>>
No. 988624 ID: c82cd0

>>988595
I think you are a male too.
>>
No. 988637 ID: 3a67fd

>>988595
We can worry about what's between our legs and how we want to be called once we're somewhere that's Not Here. First things first, get those tubes out of you, then get your lungs clear. Probably easier to do that on your hands and knees than it would be on your back, as you are. But hey, the fact we broke that... tank? Of fluid and no alarms have gone off is either a good thing or a really, really bad thing. Take a look around, too, make sure we didn't hop out of the frying pan and right into the fire.

And since we need a name, what about... Avro? Short and snappy.
>>
No. 988639 ID: f8fa51

In case you genuinely aren't aware, the name suggestions are referencing the superficial similarity between this quest so far and the opening of "Tozol Quest," of which the protagonist was named Penji, and a parody, of which the protagonist was named Venji.
>>
No. 988640 ID: 956823

>>988595
good job and ohmygosh you have godzilla colours!

anyhoo check you are/aren't alone and get yourself disentangled
>>
No. 988641 ID: 8a51ec

Names can wait, including crotch-checking but you may end up indirectly doing that anyway, right now we need to know if you're injured or a tube was pulled out of you during the breach.
>>
No. 988642 ID: 031458

Your male, of course.
>>988616
Seconding Blitz
Also, best start choking to clear your lungs.
If you still got fluid in them when you disconnect those tubes it'll be rather painful and disorienting.
>>
No. 988644 ID: b1b4f3

>>988595
Alright start detaching yourself from the machine, and look around.
>what gender?
Well you look masculine. No breasts, for one. You could check yourself out too see if you can confirm, though internal male genitalia could give the wrong impression. It's also possible you have nothing there at all, since you're likely an artificial life form.

Why don't we just go for a gender neutral name. Like uh, Veritas.
>>
No. 988657 ID: f18774
File 161386943430.png - (59.77KB , 800x600 , 8 Page.png )
988657

>Get the fluid out of your lungs.

Good idea.
*BLARGH*

>Look around and figure out where you are.

I do that as soon as I can catch my breath. The air is stale, but not toxic. The room itself is dim, and is filled with grey metal machines and objects. Across from me is a console of some type, and a set of lockers, I think. To the right of that, against the wall, is a bunch of canisters connected to pipes in the wall. The left wall doesn't have much, but the right has some tall, rectangular machines with blinking lights. The capsule behind me has a machine to the left of it when I look at it, and it has green lights. It hums softly.

>Check yourself for injuries.

After looking over the room, I pat myself down, checking for cuts and scrapes. Seems that nothing really hurt me when I fell out.

>Try to remove the tubing.

I start with the tubes on my wrists, or try to, at least. The things around my arms seem to be a clamp of sorts. The ones in my back hurt to remove, but they come out. Those needles are... pretty big. Still, I don't feel any immediate effects when I remove them.

>Names?

Why don't you guys try to get a consensus on which name you like? Blitz has two votes, which is one more than the others.

>Gender?

Everything seems internal, if I have any parts. If you say I'm a male, then I'll go with that.

After I orient myself, I try to stand. My legs are a bit shaky, but I can stand.
>Clothe yourself.
Give me something to wear! I don't see anything here!

>>988639
I'm aware of those quests, but this fellow isn't aware of them. Thanks for your concern though!
Also, sorry if the quality is a little lower. I'm not doing too well at the moment.
>>
No. 988661 ID: c82cd0

>>988657
Observe the room, see if there is anything useful.
>>
No. 988663 ID: b1b4f3

Hmm, you could bite the tubes off without removing the clamps.
Are there other containers in the room that could house more like you?

Check in the lockers.
>>
No. 988665 ID: 8a51ec

Is that a generator to your right?
>>
No. 988666 ID: b61047

>>988657
Male is more fun for a lizard, I vote male.

Aside from that, look around some more, get the gloop outta your eyes, stretch that tail, breathe some fire

The important stuff, y'know?
>>
No. 988667 ID: 031458

Check the green light machine for controls.
Rip off wrist tubing if you can't disengage the clamps.
>>
No. 988668 ID: 094652

Check the nearby machines before you cut the wires. For all you know they might be connected to your nervous system.
>>
No. 988670 ID: e7848c

Orient yourself. Find your balance. Look around, can you read anything? Stretch if you need to.
>>
No. 988671 ID: e7848c

>>988644
Also Veritas is a cool name. Second that.
>>
No. 988672 ID: 3a67fd

>>988657
Well, we've gotten some of this... stuff out of us. Caution is good. We seem to be alone and no alarms are audibly going off, so let's see if we can make out what's ON the machines before we start yanking stuff out. Assuming we can reach the lockers, let's look through them as well, see if we can't make ourselves decent. Priority one is getting free of the machinery though.
>>
No. 988673 ID: 3a67fd

What about a strawpoll, for names? Give it until tomorrow sometime and put all the names to a vote.
>>
No. 988696 ID: 410305

While you're at it, try to check for any recent presence.

Is there any exit you can spot by the way ? That might be useful in a very near future, and cameras as well.

But first priority is indeed to take these tubes off yourself, if they won't come out peacefully than remove them forcefully.

I also stand by my choice of name.
>>
No. 988698 ID: 95c8e2

Not a fan of veritas. It's the kind of name that needs to be justified by some sort of context to our existence. It's a powerful name that carries the brand of truth.
Seems out of place for a cleans slate such as ourselves.
>>
No. 988703 ID: 777990

We don't need to start naming people right away, they might already have a name.

Start getting those wires out... carefully. Time to look around this little lab you are in too, see what's in it and what the exits are.
>>
No. 988705 ID: 59b6dd

Check surroundings
>>
No. 988707 ID: f18774
File 161392196686.png - (27.71KB , 800x600 , 9 Page.png )
988707

>Steady yourself.

I get the rest of that liquid out and off of my body. I don't feel really stiff, but I flex my limbs and stretch to make sure that I can. I can't detect anything that's wrong with my motor skills.

>Check for any recent presence.

Looks like the room has been empty for a while, judging from the layer of dust on most surfaces. Or there's just a lot of dust here and it needs to be cleaned more often.

>Observe the room.

Yeah, that's a good idea. I look around and make a mental map of the room. I'll mark my position with the green arrow, so I can keep track of where in the room I am.
It looks like the machine to the left of the pod is a generator of some kind. The screen on it displays the intricacies of its function, and the three lights, from top to bottom, are "Generator", "Fuel" and "Power". Smaller writing next to those lables say that the top indicates that the generator is active, the middle shows that the fuel supply is good, and the bottom shows external power input. The lever on the left of the machine is pushed up to "ON", so it looks like some kind of generator. Maybe for emergencies. I look and see that the generator is connected to more wires, the largest is connected to the pod I was in, but others snake around the room. If I turn it off, it will probably deactivate the lights.
There's a machine that looks like some type of computer console opposite of the pod. It has three displays, and some input devices below them. I'll look closer if you want me to.
The devices that look like servers use the lights to show the status of various things. It seems that it was being used to monitor my status while I was in the pod. I can take a closer look at the labels if you'd like.
The canisters also seem to be connected to my pod. A warning lable says that these capsules can replicate their contents, and that rupturing the canister can cause an explosion. I shouldn't break them while I'm stuck in this room, since I don't know how big the blast will be.
The lockers... well, you can take a look. One is locked, two are unlocked, one has a keypad, and I'm not sure if it's active. Should I look though them?
There are no cameras here, and the door fits snug in the wall.

Should I look more closely for stuff on the walls too, or should I investigae one of these objects more closely?

>Make sure the tubes aren't connected to your nervous syetem before you try to remove them.

The machines don't tell me anything at first glance, but shifting the clamps on my wrists doesn't cause any real discomfort.

>Names?

Well you all seem to agree that I'm male, but you're still pretty split on names. Do any of you like the other names that were suggested too? I don't really need a name right now, but it would be good to call myself something if the need arises.
>>
No. 988708 ID: f7de5c

I don't think there's any need to mess with the generator for now. Open the lockers, take a look at the servers, then the console seems like a good course of action.

While we're at it, do you feel hungry, thirsty, or any physical need really.
>>
No. 988710 ID: 031458

Looking back at your earliest memories...

They referred to you as "It", suggesting they saw you as a thing or tool, not a person.

"A series are reserve forces" suggest that those in the A series are soldiers.
You were in tank A10, so you were supposed to be a soldier.

"Remain inert until they're activated" implies an artificiality and newness to you. Together with your lack of memories, it's probably safe to say you are a clone.

Remembering that earlier event despite 'not being able to form memories', having voices in your head that you instinctively label "insanity", and waking up alone with neither prompt nor directive all suggest you have some sort of mental anomaly.

So to recap, you appear to be a Clone Soldier who has self awakened due to abnormal brain development.
Congratulations. You are accidently a person.

I suppose we could put names on the backburner for now. Either someone will accidentally name you, or you'll develop an identity later that warrants a name.

Hmm... If you are indeed a clone soldier a wouldn't be surprised if you were engineered to be sexless. Perhaps it would be best not to cling to closely to a gender label until an identity is formed.

Anyway, just listen for people saying Clone, Soldier, A-series, or something of the like. They may be referring to you.

As for right now, definitely rifle through those lockers.
>>
No. 988711 ID: fa2754

Might as well take a look through those lockers. I suppose a name can wait as well. I wonder if there's a way we can test our strength without harming ourselves. Are those lockers attached to the wall or freestanding? Maybe you could lift it?
>>
No. 988712 ID: 2aa5f0

check the lockers for loot and then the computer to see if you can't find out what's going on around here.
>>
No. 988718 ID: 8a51ec

We really should hold off on names until we have a clear idea of who or what you are, checking those lockers will probably be a better use of your time anyway.
>>
No. 988719 ID: a59774

>Should I look though them?
Might as well, i mean, i doubt is boobytrapped, and you might find clothes in there, so yeah, go for it.

Name?
What about Ace, short and sweet. And starts with an A!
Can you reead what it says in the console?
>>
No. 988721 ID: c82cd0

>>988707
You can think of a name later, investigate the lockers.
>>
No. 988725 ID: 777990

Your name is now Slick Jimmy.
>>
No. 988736 ID: b1b4f3

>>988707
Search the lockers. Try forcing the locked ones open, should give you an indication of how strong you are relative to the metal they used for construction.
>>
No. 988753 ID: 23bf8a

Alex is your name!
>>
No. 988814 ID: b61047

>>988707
If we're going with names for something that is apparently a living weapon, hows about we go with radioactive elements? They're weaponized against their will, no? And SubCritical really does make me think...

So hows about a small list?
Thori - Thorium
Fermi - Fermium
Promethi - Promethium
Curi - Curium
Hassi - Hasium
Just to name a few that feel like good names, plus it seems our quest maker has already chosen Triti. Hmm!


Aside from that, I also agree with raiding the lockers and attempting to force open the closed one. If we're a weapon we might as well see how good of one we are.
>>
No. 988821 ID: 8a51ec

>>988814
I would suggest "Prometheus" but that one has a distinct bit of foreshadowing attached to it, the kind our resident flesh-puppet doesn't really deserve.
>>
No. 988824 ID: 3a67fd

>>988707
As an alternate name, why not Siev?

For things to do, though, let's poke through those open lockers first. Take stock of what's in here, see if we can make sense of where we are instead of it just being... a place.
>>
No. 988839 ID: f18774
File 161400337405.png - (86.47KB , 800x600 , 10 Page.png )
988839

PAGE 10

>Search the lockers, and try to pry the open the locked ones.

I check the lock on the far left locker first. It's locked, as expected. They appear to be built into the wall, so lifting them is out of the question, unless I want to try and destroy them. I twist and pull at the lock, to get an idea of how sturdy it is, and if I can break it. I guess I'm stronger than I thought, since the lock snapped off with a click.
>LOCKER 1 IS UNLOCKED
I check the far right locker, the one with the keypad. Also locked, and tapping on the door reveals that it is likely made out of more durable material than the others. I'm not sure if I can break it open, and if I damage it too much, the keypad won't work either. The keypad has the numbers 0-9 on it, with an enter key and a backspace key. It appears to need a 4 digit number to open. I try 1111 to see if that works.
>*BEEP*
The display flashes red and clears the number, the door still firmly locked. I don't appear to have a limit on the number of attempts I can make on this lock, so if I have an idea, I can punch in the code.

>Now actually search the lockers.

Okay, I'll make a list of what I find in them.

>LOCKERS 2 AND 3 (Open)
-Unopened bottle of anti-radiation pills
-Wearable Geiger Counter, battery powered (no batteries)
-Wearable flashlight attached to a belt (no batteries)
-Unused writing pad on a clipboard
-3 pens, red, blue and black
-A bottle of whiteout
-User's manual for the Geiger Counter
-Lab coat
-Radiation shield belt, battery powered (no batteries)
-Lab safety guide for hazardous bioforms

>LOCKER 1 (Unlocked)
-Stained lab coat
-Notebook (Used)
-1 unopened P.E.S. energy cell
-1 digital storage unit
-2 vials labeled "R-NEU AC"
-A sticky note that reads "Don't let anyone in with a rating below 'Blue 9'"

Does any of that look interesting or useful?

>Check the computer.

The monitors are backlit, but aren't displaying anything. I press one of the keys and they flicker to life. The screens display the same errors, with one obstructing the rest of the messages.
>"BREACH IN STASIS POD. PLEASE RETURN SPECIMEN TO POD OR DISENGAGE UNIT BEFORE PERFORMING FURTHER ACTIONS."
Well at least the pod isn't set to kill me on its own. I only have to worry if I press something while these tubes are hooked up to my arms. It looks like I can close out the error windows to do some stuff, if I want to. Any ideas here?

>>988710

I don't feel abnormal, but that would make sense. I doubt that having more than one voice in my head is normal. Based on what you say, my designation would probably be A10. Not the best name, but I can use it if I can't think of a better one. If I find a database, I should look up those terms.

>On the subject of names...

I don't really need a name, but some of these ideas are really interesting.

>>988814
Your logic is interesting, but sound. I can't help but feel a kinship for those elements.
>>
No. 988840 ID: f18774

I apparently need to pace myself so I don't injure myself. Apologies if the quality is poor.

>>988814
You've made some very good observations!

I'm going to try and keep up with updates, but my classes are on again, so I may be a bit slower.

Thanks again for reading!
>>
No. 988841 ID: 8a51ec

I doubt a console for these pods would have much general information on it, but anything you can learn about the people who presumably made you is worth looking for.
>>
No. 988842 ID: 3743c7

Some of that might be useful later. More immediately, though, we have:
-Notebook (Used)
-1 digital storage unit
Maybe they'll give you some idea as to what to do, or about yourself/this lab.
Use digital storage w/ computer.
Maybe see if the computer has a web browser.
>>
No. 988847 ID: 9aaeef

>>988839
Take everything anti radiation and read the manual, wear the lab coat, could be useful later, specially if it has pockets.
>>
No. 988850 ID: 2aa5f0

I say give the lab safety guide a quick look as it might help you figure out what was going on around here and see what is written in the used notebook.

and I guess throw on a lab coat for now if for no other reason then to look snazzy.
>>
No. 988853 ID: b61047

>>988839
Well if the labcoat is still stained and everything is so dusty this place is proooobably disused. Maybe you're supposed to be regularly mindwiped or ground down into meat to be remade so this doesn't happen?

Either way! Labcoat acquired. Put it on and give us a cool pose!

Then read through the notebook and the guide, look for A10 or other mentions of whatever you might be or what this place actually is. Then fill the pockets with as much of that useful looking stuff as possible. Maybe combine the antiradiation pills into one bottle to save space, though I doubt those are for us, specifically, probably for workers working with us with all this safety gear in their lockers?
>>
No. 988857 ID: 162eff

>>988839
Interesting, a lot of radiation detection and defense methods for whoever was working here, maybe you have more in common with godzilla than I realized.

Oh, as for fiddling with the computer while you are still connected can you do some kind of diagnostic on yourself or is that also locked out?

After fiddling with that I'd suggest reading the safety guide then the used notebook, might give some clues as to what is/was going on here.

Also from the radioactive name list I think Hassi is cool.
>>
No. 988858 ID: 3a67fd

>>988839
First things first, let's do what we can to get ourselves free of the pod proper. No sense in getting dressed (and never you mind how hard that would be, with all these tubes coming out of us) if we're still maybe in danger. After that, though, read that lab guide a bit, see what's what. Is there anything in there about us, specifically? Clues as to what we are if nothing else would be good.
>>
No. 988859 ID: b1b4f3

>>988839
Try using the geiger counter on yourself.
Read the used notebook.
>>
No. 988871 ID: 0fbdcd

Equip the fresh labcoat, and all the wearable tech. Stuff everything in your pockets. If space is a concern, prioritize
one pen, the pills, the vials, the battery, and the digital storage.
Read first about bioforms, and then the notebook.
>>
No. 988872 ID: f18774
File 161404640789.png - (91.87KB , 800x600 , 11 Page.png )
988872

>Put on the lab coat.
>Get the tubes out first.

I consider putting on the lab coat, but the tubing in my wrists would make that awkward. I'll get these cuffs off and tubes out before I put it on.

I decide to leave the rest of the gear in the lockers for now. I can grab what I need from the lockers as long as I'm here, but I'll also work on deciding what to take with me too.

>Use the Geiger counter on yourself.

I take a look at the Geiger counter. The P.E.S. cell in the other locker fits in it. I unpackage it and insert it in the Geiger counter, then turn it on. The device has multiple settings; an ambient detector, a directional detector, and an absorbance detector. I activate the directional detector and point it at myself. Not much of a response, but when I sweep it over the room, the counter spikes when I point it at the pod I was in. The reading is similar as I follow the IV lines that are connected to my wrists. I guess that radioactive material is being pumped into me.

I figure I should make note of this, but the P.E.S. is an energy system. It stands for Perpetual Energy Source. These batteries can produce a constant source of power when active, but degrade over time.

>Read the notebook.

I pick up the notebook and look through it. There's no name on the front, and the whole book seems to be an observation log. None of them really stand out, except one.

Subject A10 shows more potential, but as usual, the director says to leave it inactive. Carrying a Geiger on the ship puts us at a huge risk if anyone finds out. Keeping it a secret like this would create a huge problem if the ship is found in the wrong territories. That's not even getting into the risk it poses to us if it gets released without completing the programming. Again, the director refuses to let me finish the job, and A10 remains a blank slate. I've programmed basic information so that it can perform basic functions, but it wouldn't be any use in a fight. I'm going to suggest that we either complete the project, or terminate it. Leaving it in limbo is a waste of time and resources.

...I guess that means I was a defective copy. I'm not sure what they mean by 'Programming', but it's likely how I know language and basic facts and skills.

>Take a look at the console.

One look tells me that the console is not having a good time. The display is faded, and shows innumerable errors behind the first. I can still interact and close the error messages, and I notice one important message.

SUBJECT DISCONNECTED FROM STASIS UNIT. PLEASE TERMINATE OR DISENGAGE SPECIMEN BEFORE PROCEEDING.

Below that, it shows a few options; Terminate, activate and disengage, disengage.

Should I try one of those options, and what do you think of what the notebook said?
>>
No. 988873 ID: f18774

I was really tired while I did this update. I hope it still makes sense.
>>
No. 988876 ID: 2aa5f0

so is there a number on the pod you woke up from that says A10 on it or no. Just want to make sure is all. As for the computer, Disengage I guess. Hopefully it will get the cuffs off you.
>>
No. 988877 ID: b1b4f3

>>988872
Well, you already seem to be activated in some way since you can form memories. Just disengage would work fine, but you could do activate and disengage to see if your activation was incomplete somehow.
>>
No. 988878 ID: 23bf8a

disengage
>>
No. 988879 ID: 23bf8a

disengage
>>
No. 988882 ID: 3a67fd

>>988872
That's... worrying. But congratulations are in order, you're a clandestine genetic experiment left in stasis that got themselves out!

To be the paranoid sort, though, it sounds like you being out and about and not directly under their thumb... whoever they are, is something that they don't want. And considering that they made you and can, in some way, contain you probably means that we should avoid meeting them upfront where we can. Better safe than sorry.

Disengaging is the safest option for sure. Activating... could be helpful? And termination is obviously a horrible idea.

Weird that, despite radioactive material being pumped into us, we're not noticing any ill effects, or even showing it on the geiger counter.
>>
No. 988883 ID: b61047

>>988872
Huh. Maybe we can find out what element is being pumped into us and name ourselves after that? That'd be fitting.
Personally from my list I like Hassi, same as >>988857

I feel like disengage is the best option. Activate sounds like it might turn on whatever programming and I doubt we want to be a mindless soldier. If those shackles and tubes come off you better put on the labcoat and give us your snazziest smile plus a cool pose.. And then see if the door is unlocked.
>>
No. 988891 ID: f8fa51

You're being pumped full of radioactive isotopes (as a regular thing) and the type of thing that you are is apparently called a Geiger? Radical. Definitely name yourself after a radioactive element then, though which one?

"Activate" is a risk, but so is everything right now, the question is if it's worth it. Activate could perhaps give you a bit of that combat programming you're apparently missing, though I doubt that (if it was that easy, I think they'd have done that already). On the flip side, if it is going to program you, that could be a bad thing. I say take the risk, as you may not be able to get out of here without combat training of some sort.
>>
No. 988897 ID: 031458

Activate will grant you combat skills, but will also surely include loyalty routines. Also this thing looks worse for wear, so maybe not a great idea. Disengage for now.
Put on the radiation suit before leaving though. I'm sure any organics you encounter will appreciate not being irradiated.
>>
No. 988899 ID: 13845a

>The display is faded, and shows innumerable errors behind the first.
Well. That makes it seem like this place is derelict.
So, does that lab safety guide say what these choices actually do?
>>
No. 988907 ID: 410305

This is not the time to take unecessary risk about unknown procedure that we can barely grasp, let's not do anything rash and just disengage.

As for what's written in there... Yeah I'm not exactly surprised, we already dealt with that kind of situation before, so far it doesn't seems like something very dire happened, but there's no telling this early.
It does mean however that for most of the personel, and maybe the world at large, you're perceived as a threat that recquires immediate termination. Especially when whoever put this whole operation up decides to enact some "damage control".
Yup, not the most pleasant situation to be in I'll admit.

Anyhow after that I suggest pocketing the pills, the flashlght, a pen, the digital storage unit and to wear the labcoat if possible.
While we're at it, take a look a the safety guide, can't hurt to get some more info on you, even indirectly.
>>
No. 988917 ID: a59774

I am worried about the "activation" part. What are we exactly "activating"? You are already "active", so what gives?
Fuck it, just go for the "disangage" option.

I would suggest taking all the tools that need a battery, we are bound to find more batteries for those later. Especially the torch. And the pills, radiation is no joke.

Put the lab coat on, we can find more clothes later.
>>
No. 988918 ID: f18774
File 161409397782.png - (11.82KB , 800x600 , 12 Page.png )
988918

>To disengage or activate first?

I look over the tubes that were in my back. It is possible that part of the activation signal is administered though those ones too, so I decide to disengage. A partial activation could be hazardous, and I can always reconnect the drip later if I learn otherwise. I highlight the disengage option and click it. As soon as I do, I feel something pull from both of my wrists, and the manacles pop open. I lay my left arm down and open the manacle, taking a look at the internal mechanism. It seems to be some kind of heavy-duty spike. It seems a bit overkill, but I guess it would work well for torture, or for something with armoured skin.

>>988876

Yeah, if you look at the top of the pod, it says "A10", so I guess that means I'm the A10 that was mentioned.

>>988877

Yeah, this makes sense too. I am forming memories, so I'm not sure if activation would have removed those.

>>988899

Judging from the state of this room, I can guess that this room hasn't been touched in some time. Not sure if that would be the same for the other side of the door though.

>>988907

"Damage Control" does not inspire hope or confidence in me. I'm not sure I've ever dealt with this kind of situation though.

>Being filled with radiation doesn't seem to have any negative effects on you.
>The counter doesn't show any coming from you, only the IV.

I point the counter at my bleeding wrist to check. The counter spikes again. I put my hand over the directional sensor, and it reads nothing, not even atmospheric radiation. Am I some kind of creature made to absorb radiation? I guess that would explain the radiation safety gear.

>Use the radiation safety gear to avoid irradiating people.

I'm not sure if these shield belts stop radiation from both directions, but I could always give it to someone if it doesn't keep the radiation in. Still, the counter seems to say that none escapes though my skin...

...

I poke at my skin with a claw, and it makes a soft tap. I guess I don't really have skin, so much as I have fine scales.

>Put on the lab coat!

I'll do that in a bit. I want the bleeding on my wrists to stop. If it's still radioactive, I don't want to get it on any clothes I wear, since that would mean even if my scales block radiation, there would still be a source on the clothing.

>Do you know what was in the IV?

I couldn't tell you without some kind of analysis. It's a solution of some sort, and may contain multiple isotopes.

>Read the lab manual.

... Now that I think about it, I probably should have read this first. Still, it would be good to see what it has to say. When I open it, some loose sheets fall out.

When working with a Geiger unit, follow these instructions in place of the standard instructions in the indicated location.

Those pages go on to describe proper handling and safety protocols if one breaches containment. Apparently they are incredibly dangerous and have a lot of control over radiation. It also mentions that Geigers are outfitted with multiple varieties of nanobots, and how to mix them into the nutrient solution. I don't feel completely comfortable with these nanobots in my body, but I should learn what they do before I try to purge them in some way. One of the observations in the notebook from before said that a special nanobot helps with fighting off disease, so some of them may be beneficial.
The rest of the manual is fairly standard. Though someone scribbled notes in the "Neutralization of Breached Subjects" section.. It says to use the pneumatic spike from a distance.

This is interesting, and learning this makes me feel more confident in myself. I'm not sure why, but I feel some kind of pride in the fear I can instil in people.

What do you think?
>>
No. 988919 ID: 8a51ec

I think you should be slightly concerned that there's a procedure for killing you, but more importantly the labcoats would be of more use as makeshift bandages for all your open wounds than as clothes. Why use pockets when you can ball everything up in one of the labcoats like a tarp?
>>
No. 988921 ID: 9aaeef

So they had safety measures against you, you should be careful. Is this place abandoned?
>>
No. 988922 ID: 031458

Hmm... The radiation control thing is troubling. If you don't already know how to do it then you might end up irradiating someone by accident.

Look over the materials and see if you can find a section detailing your physiology and/or care. Find out what body part is responsible for your radiation control and spend some time attempting to extend your awareness over it.

While your at it, might as well read up on what it is exactly that you eat. Your dietary requirements could be unique.
>>
No. 988923 ID: fa2754

I would look into a way to possibly disengage those nanobots. You want as few knives against your throat as possible.
>>
No. 988930 ID: a59774

You seem to be quite sturdy, which is good, but they might have countermeasures to that. So you be to be careful. Avoid unnecessary interactions.
>>
No. 988933 ID: b1b4f3

>>988918
Radiation isn't exactly a good weapon for killing people since the effects are delayed. More of a weapon you'd use to render an area uninhabitable, or to make a lot of people sick at once, to cripple a military installation so that further attacks are successful. Well, I guess thermal radiation is a type of radiation. If you can output that at high enough levels it'd be viable for direct combat.
Ugh, your blood is radioactive? Well, unless there's a shower somewhere, you can't make yourself truly safe. You could tear up one of the lab coats and bind your wrists with the scraps if your bleeding doesn't stop quickly.

The fact that they advise attacking you with a weapon to take you down means they can't use the nanobots as a remote kill switch. I would guess they are entirely beneficial. Makes sense, as you generally do not want your weapons to have a backdoor that could be hacked by the enemy.

Try flipping through the unused writing pad to see if one of the pages has the locker code. Or the back of the sticky note.
>>
No. 989015 ID: 3a67fd

>>988918
...Pneumatic spike? That's worrying. Though if it's anything like a silver lining, if they can just... MAKE you, AND put functional nanobots in you, then they could use those to kill you. Maybe... maybe you can actually take the spike without dying? You just might be hardy enough to survive being impaled like that, assuming this train of thought is accurate.

If we're waiting for the bleeding to stop, make sure to hold your hands up over your head, Make sure blood has a hard time reaching those holes. Once that's done, though, let's get ourselves dressed and consider leaving. Is there any way out other than that big door?
>>
No. 989032 ID: f18774
File 161417160322.png - (33.56KB , 800x600 , 13 Page.png )
989032

>Is this place abandoned?

It seems that this room is, at least. Or whoever is supposed to work here is going to be in a lot of trouble soon.

>Read up on what you eat.

Neither the manual nor the observation log mention anything about diet. I took another look at the nutrient drip, and it's radioactive. That means I likely require radioactive substances in some quantity.

>Any mention about your physiology/care?

The materials have nothing of note when it comes to my physiology. The observations only mention chemical balances in ratios and percents, which doesn't help me, and the loose pages in the manual say to reference the Geiger handling guide.
I should probably keep an eye out for one of those if I can. It would give me a better idea of what they expect me to do, both when I'm cooperative, and when I'm not.

>Can you disengage the nanobots?

I'm not really sure how I would do that on my own. If I could control my internal mechanisms, I could probably figure out how, but right now I don't even know if I can do that. There is likely a serum for disengaging the nanobots though. I'd just have to find it.

>It may not be possible to use the nanobots as a kill switch.

That is possible, but it's also possible that they are used as a chronic kill switch. To weaken me until they can handle me. I need to learn more about the nanobots in my body before I make a final decision on them, or find a safe way to manage them, at least.
I wonder why they would use a pneumatic spike though. Are my scales that durable that bullets aren't very effective?

>Radiation isn't a good weapon for killing.

That depends on how strong the radiation is. High enough doses can take minutes to make people feel the effects, and that can be more than enough in combat, if you can captialise on it.
I don't like the idea of being used to render an area uninhabitable though. If my scales don't show any radiation on the Geiger Counter, then they'll have to open me up somehow.
I don't know if I can change the frequency of the radiation. If I can, that would give me more options, but I don't even know if I can manipulate it yet. For all I know, I'm just a nuclear sponge.

>Bleeding?

I take a look at the wounds where the IV was. I appear to heal remarkably quickly, as no new blood is seeping out of the wound.
I take the stained lab coat and wipe off the blood on a clean spot. I notice something in the pocket though.

I found an ID card! The face and writing is too faded to read though, so I don't know what the ID is. These ID cards have an RFID built in, so if I find an RFID reader, I can use that to figure out what kind of clearence this card gives me. I can at least assume that it has a rating of 'Blue 9', and would have the clearence of a technician.

>Flip though the unused writing pads and check for any notes.

Nope, completely blank. That's pretty dissapointing.

>Check the back of the sticky note.

The sticky note doesn't have anything on the back either, but I check the pockets of the fresh lab coats and find a scrap of paper. It reads...

"Remember the isotope with the most radiation."

I'm not sure how that would be helpful, but it might provide some information that can help if I knew what that isotope was.

>Put on the coat already.

I don't really have anything to cover up, but sure. I slip on one of the fresh coats and button it up. It fits better than I thought.

So now that I have a coat on, should I try to figure out how to open the remaining locker? I can also search other places in the room for anything of interest. The console has some panels that I can take off, and I haven't spent much time investigating the canisters or the servers. Not sure if I'd find much there, though.
>>
No. 989034 ID: fa2754

Suits you, boss
How active are the server lights? They look pretty lively or like they've just been idling for a while?
>>
No. 989035 ID: b61047

>>989032
Nice pose! Very snazzy!

Aside from that, hm.. Most radioactive element? 118 is of course the top one, but its half-life is basically instant so its probably not referring to that. Lawrencium and Nobelium are also up there as the most radioactive synthetic chemicals, but their half life is still too short for how long this place seems to be abandoned.

Which leaves Polonium, the most radioactive naturally occuring element. Are we Polli? Maybe.

Either way I'd check to see if the actual door is unlocked before we touch possibly explosive cannisters or mess with a locker or console that might be alarmed somehow.
>>
No. 989036 ID: 8a51ec

Making sure you're not locked in here is a high priority, but finding something to club heads with could be life-saving if any guards with pneumatic spikes are en route to splatter you like I think.
>>
No. 989037 ID: 410305

Look at you, all science ready !

Let's pray that they haven't discovered even more radioactive polonium isotope in the future and punch 210 in the locker's pad.

And yes, raiding the console before departing seems like a good idea.
>>
No. 989038 ID: 2aa5f0

well since you disengaged your cuffs does that mean the consul can be used now? Give that a look. and if so look for the highest radioactive isotope as if it's in number form it might actually be the password into the locker.
>>
No. 989043 ID: ce39da

Try 0118 or 1180 on the number pad locker.
>>
No. 989120 ID: 8ca67d

Maybe the colors and numbers are related to the keypad on the locker? Blue 9 indicates it might be the second number on the combination
>>
No. 989122 ID: f18774
File 161428489956.png - (15.86KB , 800x600 , 14 Page.png )
989122

>How active are the server lights?

Not very. Some of them blink, but most of the lights just stay as they are.

>Look at the console now that your cuffs are off.

Good call. I activate the console again, but it seems that it's also password protected. I can still access basic functions and look at the data collected by the pod, but I can't modifiy it. I can tell it to dispense fluids too, but the labels are vague, and don't let me glean much information. If I had a password, I could probably unlock the lower functions.
Taking a closer look, I can see that I was stable most of the time I was in the capsule. I figure I can see how long I was in it too, if I make an estimate between the most recent results and the earliest ones.
...
I think this pod is broken. Doing the math, I'd have been in the pod for over 620000 years, and that's stupid. Nobody lives that long, and who would keep a stasis pod that long anyway?

>Are you locked in here?

If I am, I can probably find a way to break out. Since this room is in disrepair, it would be safe to assume that it isn't as durable as it looks.
It wouldn't be hard to pull something off the wall or the console to use as a weapon, so if I don't find anything, I can do that.

>Try "118" on the locker.

I punch in '118' on the lock. The display puts a '0' at the front by default, but I hear a beep, followed by a click. The locker opens without trouble.

>The contents of locker 4 are...
-A package of P.E.S. batteries
-An injection gun, calibrated for fast administration and armoured carapaces
-An instruction manual for the injection gun
-A long rod with prongs at the top, like a plug
-2 vials of disposable medical nanobots (detox and minor repair)
-A 6 pack of energy bars

From the looks of this stuff, it's for subduing a target. I think the prongs on that rod may be for conducting electricity, to shock a target.
I also take a closer look at the rod, and it appears to have a battery slot. It's empty, so if I want to see if it's electrified, I'll have to put a power cell in.
>Raid the console.

I open the panels and look though the console's innards. Not much of note; it's dusty and full of wires and cables. The panel right under the displays has a sealed box of electrical parts, a screwdriver, pliers, and wire cutters.

Seems to be an interesting haul, but what do I do with it?
>>
No. 989123 ID: f18774

Sorry about the loss of quality. I've been having problems with my hands, and it's been hard to make a good image for the update. I hope this is temporary.
>>
No. 989125 ID: 8ca67d

Eat one of the energy bars. they're probably still alright considering how many preservatives are in them.
>>
No. 989126 ID: ce39da

Take the weapons and batteries - the latter seems to be a multi-use resource, so we'll want lots of them. Read the injection gun manual.
>>
No. 989127 ID: b1b4f3

>>989122
Read the manual for the injection gun.
What are PES batteries?

Take:
All the batteries
The shock prod
The vials
The energy bars
The digital storage unit (gonna have to find a way to read the contents later)
The radiation shield belt (not for you, for anyone else you find that's friendly)
Wear the belt sans-battery so you don't have to use pocket space for it.

...actually, can we stick the digital storage onto the console to take a look at it?
>>
No. 989129 ID: 3a67fd

>>989122
>620,000 years
You know, that might be why we woke up without anyone being present? The computer's timer malfunctioned and we hit some sort of... automatic release or something. But anyway!

We've gotten a good amount of batteries, an injection gun and presumably a few vials for it, and... not a whole lot of information. Let's give that book a once over, to be sure we understand it, and be on our way. Grab a pipe or... something, if we end up needing to clonk something over the head, and see more of this drab, metallic world.
>>
No. 989130 ID: 8a51ec

>>989129
Or the computer's timer malfunctioned because of an integer overflow, and anything else in stasis for that same time or longer is currently awake. No way that injection gun is being left in this room.
>>
No. 989131 ID: 86aaf2

There's no way the substances you've already interacted with would be stable over that period of time, so there has to be some sort of glitch. Is there an obvious means of dating how long things have been laying here? There has to be various things with a shelf life where, if left alone long enough, it would LOOK damaged or wrong in a specific way, right? Allowing you to get some sort of estimate for how long you've sat here? Maybe the batteries?
>>
No. 989132 ID: b1b4f3

The huge number of years can't possibly be correct, because no kind of power supply can last that long without maintenance. Though, I guess if they had an automated/intelligent fleet of robots maintaining the power plant it'd work?
It occurs to me that radiation is very effective against robots. You can fry their circuits.
>>
No. 989133 ID: 031458

620,000 Years is possible in space. Oh god what if your awoke on an ancient derelict. They did mention you were on a ship.

...You need to get to another console and verify this. If it's true, then at least you don't have to worry about the politics surrounding your creation.

Make a mental note to figure out how to repair and access the console. The "Programming" feature could come in very handy for you, assuming you are able to choose what is programmed.

In addition to the wires and junk in the console there are probably electronic boards of some sort. Can you tell if anything is obviously broken or burnt?
If so, does the electronics parts box have an identical replacement?
If not, we can still could repair the console later should we find another elsewhere to study/cannibalize.

If nothing else, at least take the tools. A screwdriver is always handy.
>>
No. 989135 ID: b1b4f3

In space? I'd say that's MORE difficult. An isolated spaceship would be stranded from support structures and would run out of fuel within 100 years. Even solar panels lose efficiency over time, and would be almost useless after around 10 thousand years I think. Solar boiler requires a turbine which has moving parts and thus would require maintenance.
Nuclear power lasts a while but not 620 thousand years. Also there is absolutely no way a living creature can survive in a pod for that long. It's a very, VERY long time.
Though, maybe with sufficiently advanced technology some sort of local time dilaton in the pod could work to solve the stasis problem?
I'd also question exactly how the radioactive materials in the tubes survived for 620 thousand years. Radioactive decay eventually renders materials inert, even the longest lasting ones.

If the ship is orbiting a planet that has a significant amount of supporting infrastructure on it, that would work. Some kind of nuclear power plant that's producing radioactive waste that's being used for the tubes? And the planet is rich in uranium ore or whatever, which is being enriched to fuel the power plant? Then you'd just need additional mining rigs, metallurgy facilities, and chemical factories to produce materials needed for maintenance. It would help if the planet was low-gravity, but I guess if the technology is advanced enough, moving materials to/from orbit wouldn't be a huge deal. Alternatively, the spaceship we're on is on the surface, but a lot can happen to a planet's surface in 620k years... maybe there's no volcanic/tectonic activity or intense weather though.

But in the end this is all hard science and I get the feeling this isn't a hard scifi setting.
>>
No. 989138 ID: 86aaf2

In most closed systems -- bunkers, many types of space stations, etc. -- there wouldn't be any dust on anything. Dust is mostly caused by organic life -- skin flaking off, blowing dirt, hairs, animal dander, insect parts, that sort of thing. The sorts of things you wouldn't expect in a completely closed-off system!
>>
No. 989148 ID: 2aa5f0

>Doing the math, I'd have been in the pod for over 620000 years
yeah that sounds like a decimal get misplaced somewhere. Nothing last that long and still works. but yeah, might as well read the injection gun manual. Might give you a better idea on what those nanobots in you actually do.
>>
No. 989176 ID: 031458

>>989135
He was attached to a canister of self replicating radioactive stuff.
I don't know how in the thermodynamics it works, but it makes such a situation at least plausible.
>>
No. 989186 ID: 410305

Chomp a bar, nab the batteries, grab the rod,pick up the gun and take a look at the manual.

Also we never now where we'll need them, but they sure will be handy to have at some point. I just know it.

And after that, time to take a look at that door, with a little luck it's already open, but I wouldn't bet on it.

As for spending this long time in stasis, I'd say keep in mind the number, but we know very little about... well everything, and there is a decent chance that we might be proven wrong by whatever explanation is out there.
>>
No. 989203 ID: 30a711

Note: The diary entry doesn't sound like you're a defective project, but merely one that was abandoned due to external causes.
>>
No. 989220 ID: f18774
File 161436138683.png - (67.96KB , 800x600 , 15 Page.png )
989220

>Eat one of the energy bars.

I take a look at the bar to see if it's still good. There's no expiry date on the package, so I try one, and it tastes... about as bad as I'd expect. It has a metallic taste, but nothing about it seems unsuitable for eating.

>Read the injection gun manual.

I flip though the manual, taking note of how to use it. In summary, any of the vials I've found can be filled into the gun. Each vial is one does, and the gun can hold four doses in separate tanks. The doses are fired in the order they are loaded, so if I load the gun with multiple different vials, I have to keep track of what I loaded and in what order. I can also empty doses into vials, if I have an empty one.
It looks like I can calibrate it for different kinds of skin too, so I should keep that in mind, or I might break the syringe.

I also place what I want to take with me on the console. I'll have to figure out a way to carry everything if it doesn't fit in my pockets.

>Take the weapons and batteries.

I place the rod and the injection gun on the console, and place the power cell with them. I still have one cell in the Geiger Counter, but I can take that out if I don't need the counter anymore.

>What are P.E.S. batteries?

P.E.S. stands for Perpetual Energy Source. The best way to describe them is that they are batteries that never run down. If they get damaged, that can reduce the power they output.

I also add the energy bars and the vials to the pile on the console.

>Can you put the digital storage on the console to take a look at it?

I place the storage unit on the console and stare at it. That's definitely a storage unit.

...

In all seriousness, the console doesn't have any ports, so I can't plug in the storage unit to see what's on it. I'll take that with me too, in case I find something to read it with.
I also put the belt on. No batteries, but this way it doesn't fill my pockets.

>That's a long time.

Yeah, it is. 620000 years is way too long, but there are entries for most days, and they have similar sizes. The computer probably wrote duplicate data.

>Stuff wouldn't be stable unless everything else is in stasis too.

That's also true, but that means this whole place could be locked in some kind of stasis.

>Make a note of how to repair and access the console.

I look in the wiring under the console. Nothing is visibly damaged in any way, so the console is physically fine. All I need to do is find a login to get access to the deeper functions.
I also add the tools in the drawer to the pile.

>It would be harder for a ship to survive that long in space without maintenance or support.

Yeah, that's why I don't believe it... though it is possible that I was loaded on the vessel recently, and they just took the data from the last computer that was monitoring me.
This ship also has those self-replicating capsules, so it's possible that it has some maintenance system on a micro or nano level. Perhaps it's replicating a nanobot fleet for repairs and maintaince?
If this was some kind of story, it could be a soft sci-fi setting. It would explain a lot of stuff, but why would magic be so restricted if they're this advanced?
I'll have to get to someplace with a window if I want to take a guess at where this ship is though. It's possible that this isn't even a ship anymore.

>There would be no dust in a closed system.

That's true. This place may have been an open system at one point though. Perhaps it was built in parts?

>Is the door open?

I try the handle. The door responds, and shifts. I don't open it, but it's good to know that I can leave whenever I'm ready.

>The log doesn't say you're defective, but abandoned because of external causes.

That does make sense. If I was made, then I wasn't needed, they probably wouldn't waste the resources required to activate me.

I take a bit to sort stuff into my pockets. If there's nothing else of note here, I can leave, or I can give the place a second look for anything I missed.
If I do want to leave, I need to decide how I'm going to breach the door as well. It's not locked, but I have no idea what's on the other side.
>>
No. 989221 ID: 8a51ec

Open it slightly and wait a moment before you peek out. I doubt there's anything more complex than a tripwire to consider, but you're also a walking Elephant's Foot, so not a lot is out of the realm of possibility.
>>
No. 989227 ID: 8ca67d

Try to listen to the other side of the door before opening it. If there's something dangerous in there, you should be able to hear it!
>>
No. 989240 ID: b1b4f3

>>989220
>Perpetual Energy Source
Well. Alright then, that would explain how this place is still powered regardless of how long it's been. Do you happen to know how the batteries work? Do they get energy from an alternate dimension or something?

Let's take a closer look at the servers.

Also, put a battery in the shock prod and test it to see how it's activated. Is there a trigger? Or is it contact-activated?
>>
No. 989245 ID: 3a67fd

>>989220
You could still totally get dust, though, unless whoever lives here doesn't shed any skin / hair or what have you. Still! I'm not sure what's left to do in here. We've looked at the generator, we've looked in the lockers, we've looked at the computer... about the only thing to do, maybe, is to try to set the injector to get into your skin and put the minor repair vial in, if we can figure that out.
>>
No. 989248 ID: 242921

>>989245
This or get out, slowly, quietly. Let's see were you are.
>>
No. 989311 ID: fa2754

>>989220
Just so we can cover our bases, I say we go ahead and hit ourselves with a detox vial.
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